Photo of book stack.

More Online Resources for Students and Youths with Disabilities.

We have everything here from tips for living, links to external advocacy organizations, calendar events, and more.

If you have a suggestion for a resource to add, then please don't hesitate to send us an email to let us know.


Millions in Funding Restored to California Program for Young Children With Disabilities Visit Website
The California Department of Developmental Services has announced that funding for the state's Early Start program will be restored to pre-recession levels, increasing from $270 million in 2013-2014 to $293 million in 2014-2015. The program provides treatment for 30,000 infants and children under age 3 who have adaptive, cognitive, communication, emotional, physical or social disabilities.

"State Restores Some Funding for Kids With Special Needs" (Renner, HealthyCal, 7/8).
Mobility International USA Visit Website
In today's challenging career climate, many young people with disabilities are concerned about how to stand out to future employers and take the first steps towards a career. I'm writing to share that the newest publication from Mobility International USA encourages young people with disabilities to consider the positive impact that studying or volunteering abroad can have on their future careers.
The 411 on Disability Disclosure:
A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities Visit Website
The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities is designed for youth and adults working with them to learn about disability disclosure. This workbook helps young people make informed decisions about whether or not to disclose their disability and understand how the decision may impact their education, employment, and social lives. Based on the premise that disclosure is a very personal decision, the Workbook helps young people think about and practice disclosing their disability.

The workbook does not tell a young person what to do. Rather, it helps them make informed decisions about disclosing their disability, decisions that will affect their educational, employment, and social lives.

• Watch the "411 Disability Disclosure" video
• Download "411 Disability Disclosure: Workbook for Youth with Disabilities" (PDF)
• Download "411 Disability Disclosure: Workbook for Youth with Disabilities" (DOC)
Personal Assistant Services Toolkit for
Youth with Disabilities Visit Website
This new guide assists youth in strengthening some of the most fundamental skills essential for successfully managing their own Personal Assistance Services (PAS): effective communication, time-management, working with others, and establishing professional relationships.

Here are some resources and links from the webinar training, as well as a video with youth talking about their experiences with using a personal assistant:

• Webinar YouTube Video
• PAS Took Kit for Youth in Transition (PDF)
• Personal Assistant YouTube Video (Full Version)
Congressional Anti-Bullying Caucus Report: Framework of Federal Efforts & Current Legislation Visit Website
The Congressional Anti-Bullying Caucus released this report that provided a framework of federal efforts to reduce bullying, as well as current legislation.

Bullying in the United States has been brought into the national dialogue due largely to mass media attention including coverage of bullying behavior in our schools, communities, and online, as well as major motion pictures such as the 2012 documentary Bully (directed by Lee Hirsch).1 This interest has led to increased legislative attention in the United States Congress, as well as increased resources dedicated toward bullying prevention and intervention in federal Departments.
YOUTH on the MOVE Navigating the Postschool Transition Visit Website
YOUTH on the MOVE Navigating the Postschool Transition

Anyone who has faced a transition can likely recall feeling anxious, confused, excited, and overwhelmed all at the same time. For some, the path may seem logical and straightforward; for others, it may seem daunting - or worse, unachievable. Successful transitions require comprehensive planning, good directions, regularly planned check-ins, and good guides along the way.

This website is designed to provide information, strategies, and resources to transition navigators-teachers, counselors, family members, and community providers-to guide youth on the move...
Tips for Youth & Young Adults with Disabilities Interested in a Career with the Federal Government Visit Website
Learn how the Schedule A hiring authority (Schedule A) can benefit youth and young adults with disabilities who are interested in a career with the Federal Government. Includes information on who can use Schedule A and how youth can document that they are eligible, as well as how to apply for a federal job.
How to Find Scholarships Visit Website
Scholarships are awarded for academic excellence, community service, athletic or artistic talent, and even writing and poetry. Whatever your special gifts, there is probably a scholarship to match. Scholarships do not have to be repaid, but you do have to apply for them. Each scholarship usually requires a separate application. It's never too early or too late to look for scholarships.
Mind Your Own Business Visit Website
On this site, you can find the information you need to turn your entrepreneurial dreams into reality.

Created by the U.S. Small Business Administration and Junior Achievement, this site walks you through five easy steps of business ownership - whether you've just had a brainstorm about starting your first business venture or you've been at it a few years.

So go Mind Your Own Business, and find out about the challenges and rewards of being an entrepreneur.
Bully Free World Visit Website
Let's Create a Bully Free World for Children with Special Needs.
Job Search Videos from the Department of Labor Visit Website
Videos on the following topics:
Effective Resumes
Using Social Media
Effective Techniques
Your Job Search
Strategies for Interviewing
Paid Vs Unpaid Internships and Compensation
Disability Disclosure and Accommodations Requests
Preparing for an Internship
Professional Attire
Skills for Success
On the Job Etiquette
Making the Most of Your Internship Mentoring and Networking
Making the Most of Your Internship Informational Interviews
Time and Stress Management
Lessons Learned
Lessons for the Future
Do2Learn JobTIPS Visit Website
JobTIPS is a free program designed to help individuals with disabilities such as autism spectrum disorder explore career interests, seek and obtain employment, and successfully maintain employment. JobTIPS addresses the social and behavioral differences that might make identifying, obtaining, and keeping a job more difficult for you.

Though JobTIPS is designed for direct use by individuals with autism spectrum disorder and other disabilities, this program (including all of the printables, assessments, and videos) is also suitable for delivery by teachers, family members, clinicians, mentors, and job coaches
Skills to Pay the Bills Visit Website
The U.S. Department of Labor has released "Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success," a collection of career development exercises and activities to help sharpen the communication and other "soft skills" of young workers, including those with disabilities.

The curriculum covers communication, networking, enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, problem-solving, critical thinking and professionalism. It was based on a survey of businesses to figure out the most important skills for young workers.
Student Earned Income Exclusion (SEIE) Visit Website
Definition: The SEIE is an exclusion that allows most students to work without their SSI benefit decreasing. The SEIE lets you keep the first $1,640 in earnings (checks, gift cards, and other money you are earning) each month without affecting the countable earned income calculation. But there is an annual cap of $6,600, so if you earn more than this in any given year, the income starts counting and could cause you to go into overpayment.

What is the SEIE?

It is a program that allows a person on SSI under the age of 22 and regularly attending school to earn money without having to pay it back or having your SSI check decreased in future months.

What does "regularly attending school" mean?

It means that a person is taking one or more classes and attends school regularly. Here are a few Examples of Ways to Qualify:

- In a college or university, for at least eight hours a week; or
- In grades 7 - 12, for at least 12 hours a week; or
- In a training course to prepare for employment, for at least 12 hours a week (15
hours a week if the course involves shop practice); or
- In a home school situation, for at least 12 hours per week and in accordance with
the home school law of the State or jurisdiction in which the student resides; or
- For less time than indicated above for reasons beyond the student's control,
such as illness.

Who should I talk to if I want to enroll in the program?

You should arrange an appointment with your local Social Security office to enroll in the program. If possible, schedule the appointment in person. If the person you meet with at the Social Security office is not familiar with the SEIE ask to speak to a supervisor.

Are there other rules that students can benefit from?

A Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) is another way you can earn and save money before transitioning into a job. To start a PASS plan you should contact your local Independent Living Center and discuss your PASS ideas with a Benefits Advocate.

Social Security Online Resources:

- http://www.db101.org/
- http://www.ssa.gov/ssi/spotlights/spot-student-earned-income.htm

(Sources: Social Security Administration & Disability Benefits 101)

Click to download this information as a YO! Tip Sheet (PDF)
SSI Transitions Project Visit Website
The SSI Transition Project is a collaboration between the John Burton Foundation, the Public Interest Law Project and the Alliance for Children's Rights. The goals of the Project are to help California's disabled youth make a successful transition from foster care, improve local practices in transition planning for disabled foster youth and develop a state and federal policy agenda to promote SSI utilization among foster youth in transition.

Each year, approximately 4,200 youth "age out" of California's foster care system. The challenges experienced by youth exiting foster care are compounded further for youth with serious physical and mental disabilities. One important resource for foster youth with disabilities is Supplemental Security Income (SSI). However, despite high rates of disability among foster youth, a small percentage of eligible children in the foster care system exit foster care with SSI in tact.

To ensure youth with disabilities have access to SSI, the Project:
  • Develops technical assistance and training materials to educate county agencies and nonprofit providers about SSI
  • Disseminates technical assistance materials through regional training and resources on-line
  • Provides individual consultation to demonstration counties and individual advocates
  • Coordinates statewide organizing and advocacy efforts
Navigating College: A Handbook on Self Advocacy Written for Autistic Students from Autistic Adults Visit Website
Leaving high school and going to college is complicated for everyone. But if you're a student on the autism spectrum who is about to enter higher education for the first time, it might be a little bit more complicated for you.

Maybe you're worried about getting accommodations, getting places on time, or dealing with sensory issues in a new environment. Maybe you could use some advice on how to stay healthy at school, handle dating and relationships, or talk to your friends and classmates about your disability. Maybe you want to talk to someone who's already dealt with these issues. That's where we come in.

Navigating College is an introduction to the college experience from those of us who've been there. The writers and contributors are Autistic adults, and we're giving you the advice that we wish someone could have given us when we headed off to college. We wish we could sit down and have a chat with each of you, to share our experiences and answer your questions. But since we can't teleport, and some of us have trouble meeting new people, this book is the next best thing.
Transition to Adult Living an Information and Resource Guide Visit Website
Transition to Adult Living: An Information and Resource Guide was designed to
help students and their families, local education agencies, teachers, communities,
and state agencies facilitate the movement from school to post-school activities.
Th is guide supports compliance with federal and state law by showcasing research on best practices in secondary transition that help youth move into adult roles.
We Connect Now Visit Website
We Connect is dedicated to uniting college students with disabilities in access to higher education and employment issues.
Post-High School Outcomes of Young Adults With Disabilities up to 6 Years After High School Visit Website
The National Longitudinal Transition Study provides a unique source of information to help in developing an understanding of the experiences of secondary school students with disabilities nationally as they go through their early adult years. This report addresses questions about youth with disabilities in transition by providing information over a 10-year period about a nationally representative sample of secondary school students with disabilities who were receiving special
education services under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act in the 2000–2001 school year.
Travel Guide: Preparing to GO Visit Website
Traveling is exciting, but if you are not prepared, travel can also be stressful. Do you
know how to pack for airport security? Do you have the right travel documents?
Here is information to help with everything you need to know—from packing and
flying to spending money to earning credit - with travel tips, packing lists and more.
Being prepared will make your travel experience memorable.
Disability.gov Visit Website
Disability.gov provides people with disabilities, their families, caregivers, educators, employers, service providers and others with disability-related information and resources.
When You're 18 - A Health Care Transition Guide for Young Adults Visit Website
When You're 18 - A Health Care Transition Guide for Young Adults --- this guide contains information to help young adults understand what it means to be legally in charge of their health care and how to stay healthy as they grow into adulthood.
A Practical Guide for People with Disabilities Who Want to Go to College Visit Website
How can going to school help you get a better life? Have you ever applied for a job, only to find out that you didn’t have the right level or type of education? Have you ever seen someone working at a job you’d like to have and wondered how you could get there yourself? How can this guide help you achieve the future you want?

This guide is all about planning. Remember: those who fail to plan, plan to fail. If you’ve set yourself the goal of getting a degree or a certificate from a college or a training program, what are the best first steps to take? How can you pay for it? How do you manage your
disability while you are in school?

These are all questions you need answers to before you even start looking around at
schools. This guide will help you at every turn. You will learn how to plan for picking the right school for you. You will learn how to plan for the type of degree you should pursue to get the jobs you want. You will learn how to pay for school and secure additional funding if necessary, and plan for paying back loans for tuition. Everything you need to know, from planning on how to manage your disability on campus to planning on what to do with your degree once it’s in your hands, will be addressed in this guide, with additional
resources in the back.
A Look Back at Section 504 Visit Website
San Francisco Sit-In a Defining Moment in Disability Rights History. Read articles, listen to podcasts, and watch footage from the historic disability rights protest.
Introduction to Health & Transition Visit Website
This mini-course is designed to teach you what you need to know about managing your healthcare and fitness after high school.
Learning About Money & Budgeting Visit Website
This mini-course will teach you more about money and budgeting, banking, check writing and credit card use.
Introduction to Money Budgeting Visit Website
This mini-course will teach you some basics about money. It will cover banking, writing checks, using a credit card, saving and spending.
Tips for Teens: Use Your IEP Meetings to Learn How to Advocate for Yourself Visit Website
Information for teens on how to begin to express their needs and wants by participating in their Individualized Education Program (IEP) meetings. At these meetings, teens can learn ways to talk about their disability to others, set goals, build teamwork skills, ask for accommodation and practice other self-advocacy skills. This link opens a PDF document.
Think College! College Options for People with Intellectual Disabilities Visit Website
The Think College website is written specifically for students identified as having an intellectual disability. If you are one of these students, we welcome you. Staff from Think College have organized information for you based on our direct conversations with students, families and the professional staff who are involved in helping students participate in postsecondary education.

StrengthofUs Online Resource for Young Adults Visit Website
An online social community for teens and young adults to learn about mental health conditions, services and supports and handling the unique challenges and opportunities in transition-age years. Begin your trek into adulthood by checking out information about employment, housing, college life, money matters and much more.

Moving On: The Two-Four Step Visit Website
Report on the challenges many students with disabilities face in making a successful transition from two- to four-year schools.
Off to College: Tips for Students with Visual Impairments Visit Website
Information on how to make the transition to college, including tips on finding the best school for you, visiting colleges' offices for students with disabilities, determining whether any accommodations will be needed, communicating with teachers about disability and getting books and other materials. This link opens a PDF document.
Knowing Your Options: What To Do and Where To Go Visit Website
A resource designed to provide students with an overview of the different educational and training options available after high school
My Future My Plan: A Transition Planning Resource for Life After High School Visit Website
My Future My Plan is a transition planning resource taht can be used to engage groups of students with disabilities their families and professionals in the transitions planning process. It includes a video, video discussion guide, a planning and resource book for students, and a guide to the book for family members and teachers. My Future My Plan encourages students to take a lead role in planning the life they want after high school.
Making the Move to Managing Your Own Personal Assistance Services (PAS): A Toolkit for Youth with Disabilities Transitioning to Adulthood Visit Website
Provides information about the kinds of PAS that can help a young person with disabilities become independent and transition to adulthood. Supports may include help with doing homework or getting dressed, learning to drive, reminders to complete an activity or other supports at work. This toolkit can help transition-age youth with significant disabilities and their family and friends navigate the complex world of PAS to help them make the best choices to become self-sufficient. This link opens a PDF document and the toolkit is also available in Word format.
Disability Friendly Colleges Visit Website
Online college guide for students with physical disabilities contains interactive charts of the most disability friendly colleges and profiles of the colleges that provide services necessary for students with physical disabilties to live on campus.
Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities Visit Website
The Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities (WRP) is a recruitment and referral program that connects federal sector employers nationwide with highly motivated post-secondary students and recent graduates with disabilities who are eager to prove their abilities in the workplace through summer or permanent jobs. Watch the presentation about WRP from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's TARGET Center's Discovery Series.
College Guide for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Students Visit Website
Guide for prospective college students, their parents, high school guidance counselors and others involved with assisting students in finding the right college. The guide has information based on a survey of post-secondary programs serving deaf and hard of hearing students in the United States.
College Planning Handbook for Students with Disabilities Visit Website
This handbook guides students with disabilities through some important steps and considerations to help them prepare for college. It covers issues such as self-advocacy and a student's legal rights and responsibilities. The handbook is a companion piece to College Prep Handbook from EducationQuest that has general information for all students about planning and paying for college. This link opens a PDF document.
The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities Visit Website
The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities


The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities is designed for youth and adults working with them to learn about disability disclosure. This workbook helps young people make informed decisions about whether or not to disclose their disability and understand how the decision may impact their education, employment, and social lives. Based on the premise that disclosure is a very personal decision, the Workbook helps young people think about and practice disclosing their disability.

The workbook does not tell a young person what to do. Rather, it helps them make informed decisions about disclosing their disability, decisions that will affect their educational, employment, and social lives.

Internships: The On-Ramp to Employment a Guide for Students with Disabilities Visit Website
National Consortium on Leadership and Disability for Youth

INTERNSHIPS:
THE ON-RAMP TO EMPLOYMENT
A Guide for Students with Disabilities to Getting and Making the Most of an Internship

By choosing to use this guide, you are making a very important choice for your future. For young people with and without disabilities, internship involvement is a very important step toward getting an ideal job in your career field of choice. Participating in experiences like mentoring programs, job shadowing and internships are great ways to make you stand out among other job applicants. Deciding to seek out and complete an
internship will help you as you decide what type of career you want, do better in school and ultimately allow you to make more money when you get out into the working world!
United Nations International Year of Youth (IYY) Visit Website
Welcome to the International Year of Youth (IYY)

"Youth should be given a chance to take an active part in the decision-making of local, national and global levels."
United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Welcome to the official website on the International Year of Youth. Here you will find information on events planned throughout the year, as well as suggestions on how to get involved and participate. On 18 December 2009, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution A/RES/64/134 proclaiming the year commencing on 12 August 2010 as the International Year of Youth: Dialogue and Mutual Understanding. The Year will coincide with the 25th anniversary of the first International Youth Year in 1985 on the theme Participation, Development and Peace. The resolution A/RES/64/134 is available in all United Nations Official Languages
California Coalition for Youth Visit Website
The California Coalition for Youth (CCY) is a statewide grassroots nonprofit organization that serves disconnected youth ages 12-24 throughout the state. Our vision is that every youth in California is connected to the services, resources, support and programs that need to have successful lives. The Coalition advocates for public policies, programs, and services that respect, empower, and protect the rights of all youth. We do this work through: Partnering with youth, Linking with youth-serving programs throughout California, Advocating for youth rights, Connecting youth to resources, Educating communities, policymakers and stakeholders.
California Youth Crisis Line Visit Website
California Coalition for Youth offers support, encouragement, and referrals to youth needing assistance or in crisis situations. The California Youth Crisis Line connects an average of 12,000 callers with vital resources annually.

We are proud to announce our partnership with the Operation for HOPE Foundation in the release of a statewide Awareness Poster Campaign titled "Are You Safe?" to support the work of the California Youth Crisis Line. The poster highlights 2009 World Series Champions Kiko Garcia and Luke Ramirez from San Diego, California.
Equal Rights 101 Visit Website
CALIFORNIA ROCKS WHEN IT COMES TO PREVENTING EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION

When it comes to protection from employment discrimination, you’re fortunate to be living in California which has some of the broadest civil rights laws of any state in the country.

In California, an employer cannot discriminate against you because of your race or ethnicity, because you have a mental or physical disability or medical condition, because of your sexual orientation, because of your religion, because you’re pregnant, because of your marital status… all kinds of things.

It is important that you know your rights under California’s discrimination laws—and it’s also important to know your responsibilities as an employee.

The employment discrimination laws in California are guided by the Fair Employment and Housing Act, sometimes referred to as the "FEHA." This law is enforced by the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing or "DFEH." These laws cover most every employer in California which has five or more employees--or only one or more if the issue involves harassment.

DFEH has offices located throughout the state which assist individuals with issues of illegal discrimination not only in employment, but also in housing, public accommodations (restaurants, retail stores, etc.), and acts of hate violence.

If you think you have been discriminated against on your job, go to our main website at www.dfeh.ca.gov or call us at 1-800-884-1684.
Project | SEARCH Visit Website
Project SEARCH is dedicated to providing education and training to young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities through an innovative workforce and career development model that benefits the individual,workplace,and community. Our primary goal is to secure competitive employment outcomes for each of our student graduates

Project SEARCH Wins MEAF Inclusion Champion Award

MEAF Board members, advisors, and partners gathered in Washington, DC on March 11th to celebrate 20 years of impact, innovation and inclusion. At the event, which included the CEOs from The HSC Foundation, Marriott Foundation for People with Disabilities, Girl Scout Council of the Nation's Capitol, and the Corps Network, MEAF presented Inclusion Champion Awards to eight of its grant partners for their stellar work to promote the full inclusion of youth with disabilities in society. An additional 12 awards will be presented to local inclusion champions by employee volunteers at company locations throughout the spring.
Disability Benefits 101 Visit Website
Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) helps workers, job seekers, and service providers understand the connections between work and benefits. The DB101 attitude is that the disability experience is unique for each individual, and that benefit programs can affect that experience in different ways at different times. With planning, people with disabilities can take control of finding the programs and jobs that meet their needs. For service providers and program managers, information sharing helps everyone understand how programs interact with each other. http://www.disabilitybenefits101.org/

Going to College - A Resource for Teens for Disabilities Visit Website
This new website has been developed to help high school students learn about living college life with a disability. The site provides video clips, activities, and resources that can help students get a head start in planning for college. Video interviews with college students with disabilities offer a way to hear firsthand from students with disabilities who have been successful. Modules include activities that will help students explore more about themselves, learn what to expect from college, and equip them with important considerations and tasks to complete when planning for college.
Independent Living: A Guide for Young People with Disabilities Transitioning to Adulthood Visit Website Visit Website
Every day comes with choices. You may decide what to have for lunch, the people you want to hang out with after school, or what XBOX game to play next. As you get older, those choices get bigger, like where you want to live, what job you want, and who you want to be. Up to this point many choices about the direction of your life have been made by your parent or guardian. As you get closer to becoming an adult, it is important to set goals for yourself so that you can live an independent.
Disability Mentoring Day (DMD) Visit Website
A nationwide effort to promote career development for students with disabilities through hands-on career exploration, which is coordinated by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), and partially funded by ODEP.
Proyecto Visión Visit Website
Proyecto Visión is a bilingual project of the World Institute on Disability (WID) designed to connect youth with disabilities to educational and employment opportunities. Read about what is on this website and how to use it. If you are already familiar with our work and want to see what recent additions have been made to this website, you can check out "What's New."
Guide for High Schools on Creating Job Shadowing Opportunities for Youth with Disabilities Visit Website
"How to: Build Partnerships for Career Exploration - Using Job Shadowing to Explore the World of Work" is a new guide is written for high schools on how to collaborate with a post-secondary institution or other organization to plan and carry out a job shadow day. The guide describes the preparation tasks that take place at the high school and those that take place at partner sites, then provides details for the job shadow day itself and follow-up activities. The guide includes a suggested task time-line in the back that may be helpful as a planning tool.
Stop Bullying Now! Visit Website
You can learn all about bullying and what you can do to stop it. Take a look around and you’ll find games and cartoon Webisodes that help you Take a Stand. Lend a Hand. Stop Bullying Now!
"Bullying people with disabilities is just wrong and a waste of time" Visit Website
Hey! My name is Jacob Lesner-Buxton and I am a grad student majoring in social work at Cal State East Bay. For one of my classes I am creating a website / YouTube campaign to raise awareness of the problrem of bullying of students with disabilities. I am looking for music and art articles relating to the topic. Some possible ideas are An article on a time you were bullied A hip hop track about the subject Video clips talking about how bullying affects the community.

Also if you want to do something about the disability rights movement in general that would be great.. Submissions must be received by March 15th for consideration to be posted online. If your piece is posted I will acknowledge you on the site. Also, I cannot pay you for your work. If you have any questions or need assistance please e-mail me at Jlesner@aol.com
The Children’s Council of Los Angeles County Visit Website
The Children’s Council of Los Angeles County—formerly the Los Angeles County Children’s Planning Council—was created by the Board of Supervisors in 1991 to plan and promote the coordination of services for all children in Los Angeles County to effect their protection, healthy growth, and development, as well as to advise the Board of Supervisors of the Council’s findings and recommendations.
New Websites for College-bound Students with Disabilities Visit Website
http://www.going-to-college.org This new website has been developed to help high school students learn about living college life with a disability. The site provides video clips, activities, and resources that can help students get a head start in planning for college. Video interviews with college students with disabilities offer a way to hear firsthand from students with disabilities who have been successful. Modules include activities that will help students explore more about themselves, learn what to expect from college, and equip them with important considerations and tasks to complete when planning for college.

WorkAbility I: A California Transition Program - Students Learn to Earn. http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/se/sr/wrkabltyI.asp

The Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities (WRP) is a resource to connect public and private sector employers nationwide with highly motivated postsecondary students and recent graduates with disabilities who are eager to prove their abilities in the workforce. Employers seek to fill both temporary and permanent positions in a variety of fields. http://www.dol.gov/odep/pubs/brochures/wrp1.html

Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) helps workers, job seekers, and service providers understand the connections between work and benefits. The DB101 attitude is that the disability experience is unique for each individual, and that benefit programs can affect that experience in different ways at different times. With planning, people with disabilities can take control of finding the programs and jobs that meet their needs. For service providers and program managers, information sharing helps everyone understand how programs interact with each other. http://www.disabilitybenefits101.org/

My Voice, My Vote is a new website for young adults with disabilities who want to learn about the voting process and make a difference in their communities. The site includes resources for voters in Minnesota and across the country, including the many different ways one can vote and what it means to be a good citizen. The website includes an open-captioned video on the voting process. It also includes an ASL video, "Voting: You Decide". More information on the website and the videos can be found at http://www.myvoicemyvote.org
American Association on Health & Disability Scholarship Program Visit Website
The AAHD Scholarship Program will support students with disabilities who are pursuing higher education. Preference will be given to students who plan to pursue undergraduate/graduate studies in the field of public health, health promotion, or disability studies, to include disability policy and disability research. Royalties from the Disability and Health Journal will fund the first year of the AAHD Scholarship Program.
Mental Health America Visit Website
Making the cheerleading squad. Acing the SATs. Fitting in with the popular kids. These and many other concerns are in the minds of many teens as they begin prepping for going back to school. To combat these various stressors and to treat problems like teen depression, bullying and teen self-esteem, Mental Health America offers a number of helpful brochures that specifically discuss these problems and offer solutions and resources for both parents and their teenagers.
KASA Visit Website
Kids As Self Advocates (KASA) is a national, grassroots project created by youth with disabilities for youth. We are teens and young adults with disabilities speaking out. KASA knows youth can make choices and advocate for themselves if they have the information and support they need.
Disability World Visit Website
A bi-monthly web-zine of disability news focused on youth.
Disability Law Lowdown Visit Website
Transitioning from High School to College for Students with Disabilities NEW PODCAST SHOW from the DISABILITY LAW LOWDOWN.
My CA.gov Visit Website
A web portal to California state government websites and information for students and youth.
The Service Inclusion Project Visit Website
UCLA's TARJAN Center"s Service Inclusion Project support the active engagement of people with disabilities as service members and volunteers.
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